Important notice:  For up to date information about the pandemic visit www.who.int 
  • Products and Services
    • Cash Management
    • Trade Finance
    • Forex Trading
    • Investor Services
    • Channel Services
    FX Trading
    Forex (FX) Trading with Business Online
    A real-time tool for companies dealing in foreign exchange.
    International Payments
    Transfer electronic funds reliably
    Process your cross-border payments and transfer funds between your Foreign Currency accounts.
    BOL SA App
    Convenient Banking
    Enjoy simple and convenient banking at your fingertips with the Business Online SA Mobile App
    Trade Finance
    Transact easily
    Trade Finance solution provides Documentary Trade and Open account trade finance (OATF) facilities to our Business Online clients.
  • Security Centre
  • Help and Support
  • About us
Global
Sign in

Deposit Refund Scams

This deposit refund scam is when criminals contact you telling you that an amount of money was deposited into your bank account by accident, or that they have paid you a deposit for an urgent order that must be delivered immediately.

The scammer either asks you to refund the deposit, or to release the order, amount and they send you a ‘proof of payment’. The ‘proof’ is either a copy of a deposit slip, a cheque, or an altered Internet banking payment confirmation.

Things to take note of
SCENARIOS OF SCAMS THAT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE OF

Scenario A

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A deal is structured, usually involving a direct deposit into your bank account.
  • A copy of the stamped bank deposit slip for cash is faxed to you.
  • Goods are released to fraudsters.
  • A fraudulent cheque is deposited instead of cash and the deposit slip is fraudulently amended.
  • The cheque is unpaid due to it being fraudulent.
  • Your bank account is debited.
  • You are unable to contact the "client" and suffer the loss

Scenario B

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A copy of a stamped bank deposit slip for cash, for a higher amount than originally agreed upon, is faxed to you.
  • The "client" then contacts you and requests that the excess amount be returned via electronic transfer to a specified account.

Scenario C

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A copy of a stamped bank deposit slip for cash, for a higher amount than originally agreed upon, is faxed to you.
  • An internet transfer receipt is fraudulently manipulated to reflect a "transfer" to your account. The transfer could be for the exact amount of the order as in scenario A, or for an amount in excess of the agreed amount as in scenario B.
  • The fraudulent internet receipt is faxed to you.
  • The goods are released to the criminals, or the "excess" refunded as previously described.
  • Your bank account is debited.
  • You are unable to contact the "client" and suffer the loss as the funds have already been withdrawn from the fraudster's account.
 
HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM A DEPOSIT REFUND SCAM
  • Be suspicious of any request for a refund due to overpayment
  • Phone the bank and enquire whether the deposit is a cheque or cash deposit before you make the refund. Don't use any numbers provided by the suspected fraudster. Always use the number you would normally use, or look up the number of the bank
  • Request a special clearance on cheque deposits or wait until they have cleared completely.
  • Be cautious of clients who want to ‘keep their distance’
  • Retain complete records
  • Don't be pressurised by any claims of urgency; don't relax controls and procedures; and don't proceed if you have any doubts
  • Be suspicious of a faxed confirmation of payment receipt from someone requesting a refund. Rather contact the bank for confirmation of receipt of the funds and the manner of payment
  • Report the incident the South African Police Service and provide them with all the details of the request
  • SCENARIOS OF SCAMS THAT YOU SHOULD BE AWARE OF
  • HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM A DEPOSIT REFUND SCAM

Scenario A

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A deal is structured, usually involving a direct deposit into your bank account.
  • A copy of the stamped bank deposit slip for cash is faxed to you.
  • Goods are released to fraudsters.
  • A fraudulent cheque is deposited instead of cash and the deposit slip is fraudulently amended.
  • The cheque is unpaid due to it being fraudulent.
  • Your bank account is debited.
  • You are unable to contact the "client" and suffer the loss

Scenario B

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A copy of a stamped bank deposit slip for cash, for a higher amount than originally agreed upon, is faxed to you.
  • The "client" then contacts you and requests that the excess amount be returned via electronic transfer to a specified account.

Scenario C

  • You are approached via telephone or email with an urgent order.
  • A copy of a stamped bank deposit slip for cash, for a higher amount than originally agreed upon, is faxed to you.
  • An internet transfer receipt is fraudulently manipulated to reflect a "transfer" to your account. The transfer could be for the exact amount of the order as in scenario A, or for an amount in excess of the agreed amount as in scenario B.
  • The fraudulent internet receipt is faxed to you.
  • The goods are released to the criminals, or the "excess" refunded as previously described.
  • Your bank account is debited.
  • You are unable to contact the "client" and suffer the loss as the funds have already been withdrawn from the fraudster's account.
 
  • Be suspicious of any request for a refund due to overpayment
  • Phone the bank and enquire whether the deposit is a cheque or cash deposit before you make the refund. Don't use any numbers provided by the suspected fraudster. Always use the number you would normally use, or look up the number of the bank
  • Request a special clearance on cheque deposits or wait until they have cleared completely.
  • Be cautious of clients who want to ‘keep their distance’
  • Retain complete records
  • Don't be pressurised by any claims of urgency; don't relax controls and procedures; and don't proceed if you have any doubts
  • Be suspicious of a faxed confirmation of payment receipt from someone requesting a refund. Rather contact the bank for confirmation of receipt of the funds and the manner of payment
  • Report the incident the South African Police Service and provide them with all the details of the request